Questo sito utilizza cookie di terze parti per inviarti pubblicità in linea con le tue preferenze. Se vuoi saperne di più clicca QUI 
Chiudendo questo banner, scorrendo questa pagina, cliccando su un link o proseguendo la navigazione in altra maniera, acconsenti all'uso dei cookie. OK

Foreign Aid-Corruption Nexus in Cambodia: Its Consequences on the Propensity of Civil War

Contemporary Cambodia is most likely best known for two things—aid dependency and corruption. The thesis initially seeks to examine the nexus between foreign aid and corruption in
Cambodia since 1993, the time when a huge influx of foreign aid injected into the country following the withdrawal of UNTAC, then explores if the correlation of the two encourages the propensity of civil war, and ultimately analyzes if the onset of civil war is attainable in the case that the propensity of civil war is feasible. Drawing from the analysis, the thesis concludes that “Foreign aid, particularly loans, indirectly instigates civil war by partly generating corruption, particularly political corruption, because corruption makes aid ineffective in contributing to economic growth and poverty reduction, while encourages huge economic inequality and chronic poverty, which makes Cambodia more vulnerable and prone to civil war”. However, the civil war in Cambodia is manifested or not depends on the motivation and initiative to be resisted and the means of financing the resistant group. Given the status quo of Cambodia, it is possible that
the prominent opposition groups such as the opposition political parties can initiate the resistant movement; but it seems improbable. Concerning the ways of financing the rebel movement, by applying the Collier and Hoeffler Model of Civil War, although the opportunity of recruiting the members of the rebel group, the given natural geography, and the cohesion of the movement seems merely attainable, the way of financing the rebellion, through three fundamental means—extortion from the primary commodities-natural resources, donation from diaspora, and subvention from hostile governments—is unlikely feasible. If motivation and finance were not achievable, the rebel movement could not even be formed. However, sometimes unpredictable things might happen.

Mostra/Nascondi contenuto.
6 CHAPTER I Introduction 1. Background, Rationale, and Objectives From the outside world, Cambodia is best known, in both national and world history, for two totally opposite things—the glorious past of Angkor (12th-15th century), the brightest page of Cambodian history, and the brutally genocidal Khmer Rouge regime (1975-1979), the darkest page. It has been true and continues to be true in present-day Cambodia even among the Cambodians themselves, but there are two more things that contemporary Cambodia is also most likely well- known. They are aid-dependency and corruption. Cambodia’s history has had many notable events. It has survived being trampled by foreigners for centuries. More recently, it was dragged into the Vietnam War and fell into bloody civil war that turned into a vast killing field by the genocidal Khmer Rouge. Then, it fell into the Vietnamese occupation that turned again into an unwinnable war between the Vietnamese troops and the Khmer Rouge. Ultimately, it descended into a so-called peace full existence with the signing of Paris Peace Accords of 23 October 1991. This led to a state of negative peace around 1998 when the Khmer Rouge was finally extinguished. Cambodia nowadays, though relatively stable, has seen slow economic growth. These conditions are, arguably, the byproducts of the peace agreement and the shift from a centralized planned economy to a more decentralized and open market economy. However, Cambodia depends heavily on foreign aid to survive, and is a nation racked by rampant corruption. Approximately half of Cambodia’s national revenue is shared by foreign aid (Ek & Sok, 2008), and Cambodia was ranked 166 out of 180 countries surveyed in 2008-Corruption Perceptions Index of the Transparency International, making it the 14th most corrupt country in the world, and the second most corrupt country in Asia behind Myanmar (Transparency International, 2008). This current condition and unusual political and economic dynamics constitute the focus of this thesis. The thesis initially seeks to examine the nexus between foreign aid and corruption in Cambodia since 1993, the time when a huge influx of foreign aid injected into the country following the withdrawal of the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC). Drawing from the analysis of the two, the thesis then explores if the correlation of the two encourages the propensity of civil war, and ultimately analyzes if the onset of civil war is attainable in the case that

International thesis/dissertation

Autore: Sopheada Phy Contatta »

Composta da 73 pagine.

 

Questa tesi ha raggiunto 55 click dal 22/01/2010.

 

Consultata integralmente una volta.

Disponibile in PDF, la consultazione è esclusivamente in formato digitale.