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The
 Philosophy
 of
 9/11:
 A 
Critical 
Analysis 
of 
the 
Main 
Debates

The primary purpose of this dissertation is to critically review and evaluate some of the most significant theories and debates that have sprung up following the 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. The approach taken is a broadly philosophical one, with preference given to the opinions of philosophers, but the works covered are quite diverse, ranging from political philosophy to cultural studies.
The general aims of the discussion are twofold: firstly, to highlight and examine the political meaning behind the various speculations and theories presented; secondly, to advance a possible philosophical conceptualization of 9/11 as a properly political act that can overcome the most evident shortcomings of the theories under study.
The dissertation is divided into three chapters. The first chapter presents an investigation of the characteristics of terrorism in general, and of 9/11-type terrorism in particular. The idea of a “new terrorism,” most famously described by Walter Laqueur and largely influential on the 2002 U.S. security strategy, is challenged. Emphasis is placed on the political goals of terrorism.
The second chapter focuses on the scathing cultural critiques offered by Jean Baudrillard and Slavoj Žižek. Terrorism is here tackled as an abstract and symbolic attack on American hegemony. These much-celebrated contributions are subjected to considerable criticism in an effort to expose their failures to provide workable political frameworks.
The third chapter pulls together the two strands of the argument in the preceding chapters by presenting the views of Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida, and contextualizing them in a wider discussion of democracy and the nature of politics. Finally, it champions a constructivist account of politics and morality that reconciles Carl Schmitt’s concept of the political with Joseph Margolis’s moral theory of “partisan interests.”

Mostra/Nascondi contenuto.
Alberto
Di
Felice

The
Philosophy
of
9/11 Introduction Any
discussion
of
9/11
risks
being
futile
at
this
historical
juncture,
and
 must
probably
take
good
note
of
the
fact
that
nothing
new
or
especially
 noteworthy
can
be
said.
The
United
States
has
now
elected
a
new
presi‐ dent,
who
in
the
eyes
of
many
both
at
home
and
abroad
represents
a
 veritable
“new
hope.”
The
election
of
Barack
Obama
following
the
two
 George
 W.
 Bush
 mandates
 is
 arguably
 the
 clearest
 signal
 that
 most
 Americans
feel
their
country
can
no
longer
afford
to
hold
the
same
per‐ ception
 of
 itself
 as
 that
 which
 has
 gained
 primacy
 in
 the
 military aftermath
of
the
attacks.
The
judgment
that
the
2008
election
has
im‐ plicitly
passed
on
American
unilateralism
seems
to
me
to
be
so
self evident
as
to
call
for
no
particular
elaboration.
If
nothing
else,
the
cur‐ rent
economic
crisis,
with
the
unchangeable
force
of
material
facts,
has
 helped
Americans
refocus
their
priorities,
and
has
forced
them
to
think
 of
defending
their
own
freedom
and
wellbeing
in
more
moderate
and
 realistic
ways.
Whether,
and
to
what
extent,
this
initial
hope
and
good‐ will
will
be
fulfilled
is
of
course
a
matter
for
history
to
determine. That
nothing
new
can
be
said,
however,
is
reason
good
enough
to
 return
on
what
has
been
already
said.
It
will
be
thus
made
apparent,
 perhaps,
that
nothing
genuinely
new
had
really
been
advanced
in
the
 first
place,
and
that
the
wars
that
have
been
fought
in
response
to
the
 attacks
have
largely
been
supported
or
opposed
for
quite
irrelevant
rea‐ sons.
This,
in
a
way,
will
be
the
object
of
the
present
work.
I
regard
what
 follows
as
an
extension
of
my
early
interest
in
the
philosophy
of
law,
 though
it
does
not
much
rely
on
legal
doctrines
and
principles.
It
is,
 rather,
a
student’s
modest
attempt
to
capture
philosophically
what
I
 deem
to
be
the
basic
political
import
of
September
11,
2001,
by
touching
 upon
issues
of
rationality,
natural
versus
positive
rights,
and
the
like.
As
 both
law
and
politics
have
as
their
subject
matter
the
existence
of
com‐ munities
 in
 need
 of
 regulating
 themselves
 by
 means
 of
 law
 and
 government,
political
philosophy
and
the
philosophy
of
law
are
bound
 5 —





‐


Laurea liv.II (specialistica)

Facoltà: School of International Studies

Autore: Alberto Di Felice Contatta »

Composta da 128 pagine.

 

Questa tesi ha raggiunto 151 click dal 31/08/2010.

Disponibile in PDF, la consultazione è esclusivamente in formato digitale.